Weekend looking and listening

Three things to do this weekend in London:

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Chosil Kil, Niagara at Rowing Projects 
- London solo show for Korean artist Chosil Kil

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Artists’ Film Club: Haris Epaminonda Selects at ICA
- with performance from Part Wild Horses Mane on Both Sides

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Simon Dybbroe Møller, Swallow Swallow Spit at Laura Bartlett Gallery
- last week to see Dybbroe Møller’s sculptural meditation on appropriation 

4 THINGS FOR A RAINY WEEK IN LONDON

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Redmond Entwistle, Monuments 2010, film still
Courtesy the artist, © Redmond Entwistle

It’s a busy week for the curious in London town, here’s my pick:

Monday - Assembly: Regeneration II @ Tate Britain

4 short films reimagining historical events/ artworks including Beatrice Gibson’s The Tiger’s Mind, which uses Cornelius Cardew’s 1967 score as a way of producing speech - also stars John Tilbury

Tuesday - The New Experimentalists @ Queen Elizabeth Hall 

Four of the most forward thinking musicmakers/composers/artists working in the UK today shortlisted by a Brian Eno headlined panel. Such a strong line-up, including Lithuanian artist Lina Lapelyte’s opera Candy Shop setting misogynist hip-hop lyrics.

Wednesday - Anat Ben David: MeleCH @ Stanley Picker Gallery 

Performer, artist, Chicks on Speed member Anat Ben David’s new 3 channel film/sound installation that’s emerged from her PhD in bio mechanics and performance improvisation. One off live performance.

Friday - Mountains of Tongues @ Cafe Oto

Launch of a new record celebrating the cultures of the Caucasus, including live performance from Chris Hladowski’s Family Elan, as well Georgian polyphonic choir Maspindzeli - expect otherworldly harmonies.

The Artangel Podcast: Dig!

An archaeologist, an anthropologist and a psychoanalyst visit Dig, Daniel Silver’s Artangel project set in an abandoned, overgrown landscape in central London. Three experts encounter the split-level work for the first time and explore its many layers of possible meaning: from Freudian visions of Rome and the subconscious to the iconography of unknowable utopias.

This podcast can be enjoyed both as a standalone programme or to accompany a visit to the project itself.

Featuring

Ludovic Coupaye, lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at UCL and curator of the Ethnographic Collection
Ian Jenkins
, Senior Curator at the British Museum with responsibility for ancient Greek collections
Jay Watts, psychotherapist, Lacanian analyst and Senior Lecturer at City University
and
Daniel Silver, the artist behind Dig

Producer: Peter Meanwell

MOTOR: Bettina Buck invites Marie Lund 7 December 2013–22 February 2014

Way down Exeter way, a two woman one-man show, Bettina Buck invites Marie Lund. Pashminas frozen in concrete, compressed yellowing foam under huge immobile blocks of slate, and slowly decaying outdoor pieces. 

Artangel Podcast: Yael Bartana

Layered with sounds, speeches and dialogue from the films, this sixth edition of The Artangel Podcast collates thoughts about the project from the following speakers, many of whom attended the Jewish Renaissance Movement in Poland’s first congress in Berlin::
Yael Bartana, the artist behind And Europe Will Be Stunned
Jakub Czupryński, a guide, genealogist and researcher tracing Jewish roots in Poland
Galit Eilat, a writer, curator and research curator at the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven
Gil Hochberg, an associate professor of Comparative Literature at UCLA
Yosefa Loshitzky, Professor of Film, Media and Cultural Studies at the University of East London
Daniel Meir, sound designer of the film trilogy
Zoran Terzic, teacher in political aesthetics at Humboldt University
Michał Zadara, Polish theatre director, set designer and multimedia artist
Dana Yahalomi, co-founder of Public Movement. Performed as Dana Sierakowski in And Europe Will Be Stunned
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Obituary Notice

Here’s a radio programme i’ve been busy making:


Nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian mountains, three times a day local radio station WPAQ 740AM proudly broadcasts obituaries of local people. Established by Ralph Epperson in 1948, WPAQ was founded to preserve a wholesome way of life on the airwaves, broadcasting local Old Time and Gospel music, firebrand local preachers, and the daily reporting of obituary notices. Today, to an outsider it seems a morbid anachronism, yet people across the town of Mt Airy tune in on a daily basis, especially to catch news of those who have died.

As well as exploring the Radio’s archive to build a picture of this wholesome way of life over the last 60 years, local people talk about how the town has changed since the obituary reading began. From a famed and thriving industrial town making socks, farming tobacco, building furniture and mining granite, Mt Airy has witnessed the decline of the American South, and the flight of jobs from its rural areas. Almost all the industry has gone and the town is struggling to find its place in a new non-industrial economy. Those who live there are concerned about the future for the town’s young people, but are full of nostalgia for the past, and love the close knit community.

Whether the daily Obituary Notices are for the local individuals who pass each day, taking with them another chapter of this part of America’s unique rural history, or whether they are a collective sigh for a disappearing way of life is not clear - life in some form will go on in the American South, and WPAQ will still broadcast obituaries.

All the material for this programme was recorded in and around the town of Mt Airy, North Carolina. Drawing heavily on local field recordings, the reminiscence of local people, and the archive of WPAQ 740AM, to create an aural portrait of a community of people united by a slowly disappearing way of life.

I saw this man twice over the summer, he rips up stages like a reincarnated Little Richard who learnt Swahili somewhere in the afterlife, and now tours with his tight Rumba band, L’Orchestre de La Katuba. Baloji is Congolese, via Belgium, and he’s guesting here on Hackney combo ‘The Very Best’s rerub of Super Mom.. 
http://soundcloud.com/theverybest/the-very-best-super-mom-feat

I saw this man twice over the summer, he rips up stages like a reincarnated Little Richard who learnt Swahili somewhere in the afterlife, and now tours with his tight Rumba band, L’Orchestre de La Katuba. Baloji is Congolese, via Belgium, and he’s guesting here on Hackney combo ‘The Very Best’s rerub of Super Mom.. 

http://soundcloud.com/theverybest/the-very-best-super-mom-feat

The Science Museum’s History of Electronic Music exhibition opens fully this week - they have Daphne Oram’s groundbreaking 60s Oramics machine too..
http://sciencemuseumdiscovery.com/blogs/insight/back-to-the-future-of-electronic-music/

The Science Museum’s History of Electronic Music exhibition opens fully this week - they have Daphne Oram’s groundbreaking 60s Oramics machine too..

http://sciencemuseumdiscovery.com/blogs/insight/back-to-the-future-of-electronic-music/

New music from Anna Meredith - young British composer - this new EP has the same sense of playfulness that inhabits her orchestral writing, but this time it’s odd electronics, and deconstructed power ballads - fun.
http://soundcloud.com/annameredith/sets/black-prince-fury/

New music from Anna Meredith - young British composer - this new EP has the same sense of playfulness that inhabits her orchestral writing, but this time it’s odd electronics, and deconstructed power ballads - fun.

http://soundcloud.com/annameredith/sets/black-prince-fury/

This week I went to see, for the first and last time, the legendary Merce Cunningham Dance Company performing Roaratorio - an hour of intense sound collage from John Cage reimagining Joyce’s Finnegans Wake, accompanied by a merry-go-round of classic Cunningham choreography, with bright unitards to match. Formed in the mid 50s at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, MCDC tore apart the connections between music, dance and visuals, and re-assembled the three components back on stage with a sense of life, freedom and energy. From that initial trio of John Cage, Merce Cunningham and Robert Rauschenberg, and following Cunningham’s death in 2009, the company is now at the end of its legacy tour, and it will cease to be in December, with a final performance at the Armoury. New York in the 50s is now part of the history of experimentalism, a golden time preserved in aspic. Seeing Merce’s company dance one last time, brought it vividly back to life.

This week I went to see, for the first and last time, the legendary Merce Cunningham Dance Company performing Roaratorio - an hour of intense sound collage from John Cage reimagining Joyce’s Finnegans Wake, accompanied by a merry-go-round of classic Cunningham choreography, with bright unitards to match. Formed in the mid 50s at Black Mountain College in North Carolina, MCDC tore apart the connections between music, dance and visuals, and re-assembled the three components back on stage with a sense of life, freedom and energy. From that initial trio of John Cage, Merce Cunningham and Robert Rauschenberg, and following Cunningham’s death in 2009, the company is now at the end of its legacy tour, and it will cease to be in December, with a final performance at the Armoury. New York in the 50s is now part of the history of experimentalism, a golden time preserved in aspic. Seeing Merce’s company dance one last time, brought it vividly back to life.

Junya Ishigami: Architecture of Air

Junya Ishigami’s installation at the Barbican Curve, running til October 16th, is almost non existent. Gossamer thin threads invisible against the gallery’s white walls support a 4m tall free standing structure that itself is almost non existant. The artists equates the wafer thin structures to rain and cloud drops, architecture as nature, it has an airy mythic quality calling into question ideas of space and structure.

http://www.barbican.org.uk/artgallery/event-detail.asp?ID=11988

Arrow Japan make some of the simplest most functional city bicycles ever. No one so far sells them in the UK, most probably because they’re handmade in Yokohama.

Arrow Japan make some of the simplest most functional city bicycles ever. No one so far sells them in the UK, most probably because they’re handmade in Yokohama.

I finally made it to the third round of this Arnolfini-Camden Arts Centre-Oxford Modern Art triple commission. American artist Kerry Tribe uses 1/4” tape and 16mm film loops, in clever room based installations to look at ideas of memory and recall. This piece was a tape loop that ran round the whole gallery - one reel-to-reel machine erasing, the other writing, in a constant feedback loop of remembering and forgetting, blurring the lines between reality and story.

I finally made it to the third round of this Arnolfini-Camden Arts Centre-Oxford Modern Art triple commission. American artist Kerry Tribe uses 1/4” tape and 16mm film loops, in clever room based installations to look at ideas of memory and recall. This piece was a tape loop that ran round the whole gallery - one reel-to-reel machine erasing, the other writing, in a constant feedback loop of remembering and forgetting, blurring the lines between reality and story.